New brochures answer questions about court records and public access

The Maryland Access to Justice Commission has created four brochures about access to court records that explain what the public can and can’t see, and how to request that the court limit public access to court records.

The following brochures are now available, free of charge:

Maryland Access to Justice Commission four brochures
  1. What can the public see about me in court records and on Maryland Case Search? – with general information for the public.
  2. Can I keep the public from seeing information about me in a court case? – with help for people who want to limit access to information in the court’s records.
  3. Can I keep the public from seeing information about me in a peace or protective order case? (for respondents) – with information on the specific procedure required for people who are or have been the respondent in a peace or protective order case.
  4. Expungement of criminal records – with information for state criminal defendants on how to request the removal of a criminal record from Maryland state court records.

The brochures can be viewed and printed from the Judiciary’s website, and are available at most courthouses throughout the state. Legal services providers can also order free copies of the brochure online to distribute to the public.

What is the Maryland Access to Justice Commission?

The Maryland Access to Justice Commission was created in 2008 by Chief Judge Robert M. Bell to improve and expand all people’s access to the state’s civil justice system. A coalition of representatives from Maryland courts, executive branch agencies, legislators, attorneys, social services and faith groups, and legal service providers, the commission recommends changes to improve the ability of all Marylanders to use the courts effectively and to obtain legal help when they need it. It primarily focuses on expanding access to the state’s civil justice system, which includes landlord-tenant cases, divorce, child custody issues, small claims and debt collection, domestic violence, and other non-criminal matters.